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20100914
20100914
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
army post in italy with his wife, jennifer, when the call came from washington. >> my heart started racing pretty fast at that time, and then when he said president barack obama, it just started really pounding. >> reporter: he was just 22 years old at the time, during this battle, which abc news cameras captured. it was a fight so intense, an ambush so sudden, that soldiers were lying wounded within seconds. among them, giunta's closest friend, sergeant josh brennan, shot multiple times and cut off from the other soldiers. >> to tell the story about that day hurts me. >> reporter: staff sergeant brett perry back in afghanistan for a second tour was with giunta on that frigid mountain during the battle. >> i can't even begin to describe how intense it was. the most intense whizzes i've ever heard from bullets just going right over us. >> reporter: with two taliban fighters now dragging his friend josh brennan away giunta charged right into the ambush, killing one of the taliban fighters and chasing the other away. giunta pulled his friend brennan to safety. >> sergeant giunta was ju
of illinois. joining me now to talk about this is deputy personal finance editor jennifer merritt. she oversaw the research for the "wall street journal." the bottom line here is for that first job, businesses seem to be preferring not the ivy leagues, but others. these are no slouch schools. this is not like, oh, gosh, let's take second best. those are great schools. why, though, this over the ivy leagues? >> for these entry level jobs people are hoping to grow candidates into the company with. and so one of the reasons is they come very academically prepared. they've all had a major. so they've really got the great, deep skills in a subject. and then because they've got to really fend for themselves at these big schools and take advantage of various resources and network and the wide networks. they're also sort of able to come in, hit the ground running, and that well roundedness. >> ivy league graduates are seen as less -- >> they're less technically prepared in a lot of ways. most ivy league schools don't have majors in a traditional sense, don't have a lot of that bread and butter course
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)